About Me

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I am the Pastor/Teacher of Rivers of Joy Baptist Church in Minford, Ohio since August 2008.  I am married to Charity since June 14, 1969.  I have four grown children.   Having served in the local church for over forty years as Pastor/Teacher, Asso., Youth Pastor, Minister of Education, Building Upkeep, Camp Director, Sunday School Teacher, etc. Also I have worked in the public place for as many years as I have preached. Charity and her sister are co owner of Union Mills Conf. (Bakery) in West Portsmouth Ohio

TROUBLSHOOTING PROBLEMS IN THE CHURCH

EVERETTE WHISNANT AND PAULINE WHISNANT
I HAVE LEARNED THAT PEOPLE OUTSIDE YOUR CHURCH ARE GOING TO KNOW WHAT IS GOING ON INSIDE THE CHURCH.


AND WHAT YOU MIGHT TRY IF YOU GO PUBLIC WITH YOUR PROBLEMS



For some reason, leadership want all the troubles, disagreement, problems, in the church to say secret. This is not going to happen. Leadership often want to cover up any difficult that the leadership is having, or the membership is having. So they will focus on what they believe are the stronger points of the church. If the attendance is low, they will focus on the giving.



I believe the term is "troubleshooting" the act or process of identifying and eliminating problems or faults. So how does leadership go about troubleshooting?


LEADERSHIP PLANNING SESSION:


Once you have acknowledged the problem, admitted to your mistakes, presented the plan, answered questions, you’ll want to leave 25-30 minutes to recap with vision.

You might consider:
  1. Restating what the plan is going to be (in an abbreviated form).
  2. Remind the people what we’re really about.
  3. Tell a compelling story that helps illustrate the vision.
  4. State what you are going to do personally to make a difference.
  5. Explain frankly that things may be challenging as we work through this next season, but here is what you believe will happen on the other side.

Whatever you do—lead with vision! Don’t ever think you have explained the vision too many times. Explain it again!


IF YOU DECIDED TO GO PUBLIC (CHURCH BODY):

If you have decided to go public with a problem, you will have admitted the challenge, owned your mistakes, and suggested a plan. Think of that.


Now you’ll want to consider answering questions.
  • The reason I say “consider” answering questions is because this won’t always be the right thing to do. But often, it is one of the best things to do.
Here are some thoughts about answering questions:
  • Since you aren’t hiding anything, answering questions is one way to show everything is on the table. People know, so let them know.
  • If you answer questions, it might help you address something that most people are asking that you didn’t already address. Knowing the question before you ask the question, and then you can know the answers.

  • Questions can give you a chance to share more vision.

Some dangers include:

  1. You might have someone who may try to take dominate the meeting. A strong leader can handle this type of person. If you don’t think you can, you might want to avoid answering questions in a potentially hostile climate.

  2. If you’re not confident in where you are going, answering questions will make you look weak and hesitant.
  3. Answering questions can (in the wrong environment) make you look like you are on trial.


In my personal style of leadership, I lean toward answering questions. I’m not afraid to go head-on and like to have everything on the table. If you do answer questions, I’d suggest a time limit.


What happens far too often is the problems are not address correctly and than you have a greater problem that you are not able to overcome.


It seems that the LORD has allowed me to be a "troubleshooter" in a number of churches over the years. My Dad was often asked to come to churches to be a "troubleshooter", to help the church solve their problems. He was really good with this process.
ALL CHURCH HAVE CHALLENGING PROBLEMS. ALL CHURCH NEED TO KEEP CURRENT PROBLEMS ON THE TABLE AND KEEP THE VISION BEFORE THE PEOPLE.