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I am the Pastor/Teacher of Rivers of Joy Baptist Church in Minford, Ohio since August 2008.  I am married to Charity since June 14, 1969.  I have four grown children.   Having served in the local church for over forty years as Pastor/Teacher, Asso., Youth Pastor, Minister of Education, Building Upkeep, Camp Director, Sunday School Teacher, etc. Also I have worked in the public place for as many years as I have preached. Charity and her sister are co owner of Union Mills Conf. (Bakery) in West Portsmouth Ohio

THE PREACHING OF JESUS AT NAZARETH, AND ITS RESULT.

Luke 4 Ministrry of Jesus Christ
JESUS READS THE SCRIPTURES
(Matthew 4:12-17; Mark 1:14-15) (Luke 4:14-31)
JESUS IN THE SYNAGOGUE AT NAZARETH
READING TO THE CONGREGATION SCRIPTURE
Luke 4  Jesus bible Equiping bible
READ THE TEXT, EXPLAINING THE TEXT, APPLIED THE TEXT
ITS CALL EXPOSITIONAL PREACHING/TEACHING


PASTOR/TEACHER CHARLES e. WHISNANT
INTRODUCTION TO THE
These verses relate events which are only recorded in Luke. They describe the first visit which our Lord paid, after entering on His public ministry, to the city of Nazareth, where He had been brought up. Taken together with the two verses which immediately follow, they furnish an awfully striking proof, that “the carnal mind is enmeity againt God (Romans 8:7)

  1. We can learn from the Lord's visit to the assembly of worshippers in the Jewish synagogue:
  2. We are not to lightly to forsake any assembly of worshipers which professes to respect the name, the day and the book of God.
  3. There may be many things in such an assembly which might be done better: there may be a deficiency of fullness, clearness, and distinctness in the doctrine preached.
There are 1000's who do listen regularly to the preaching of the Gospel, and admire it while they listen. They do not dispute the truth of what they hear. They even feel a kind of intellectual pleasure in hearing a good and powerful sermon. But there religon never goes beyond this point.

Their sermon hearing does not prevent them living a life of thoughtlessness, worldliness and sin.


Luke 4:14-31 Verse 14  And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee: and there went out a fame of him through all the region round about.


2363 Jesus Christ, preaching and teaching of
A vital feature of Jesus Christ’s ministry, focusing on his authoritative proclamation of the kingdom of God.
Jesus Christ’s mission as preaching and teaching
Lk 4:43 pp Mk 1:38 See also Mt 11:5 pp Lk 7:22; Mk 6:6; Jn 7:16; Ac 1:1

Jesus Christ was regarded as a teacher and prophet
  • Jn 1:38 “Rabbi” was an honorific title given to Jesus Christ unofficially by the people. See also Mt 16:14 pp Mk 8:28 pp Lk 9:19; Mt 23:10; Mt 26:25; Mk 9:5; Mk 10:51; Jn 13:13
The sources of Jesus Christ’s preaching and teaching
Jesus Christ’s words were grounded in Scripture
  • Lk 24:27 See also Mt 4:4  Lk 4:4; Dt 8:3; Mt 21:16; Ps 8:2; Mt 22:29-32  Mk 12:24-27  Lk 20:35-38
Jesus Christ’s words came from God
  • Jn 7:16 See also Jn 3:2; Jn 8:28; Jn 12:49-50
Jesus Christ spoke in the power of the Spirit
  • Ac 1:2 See also Lk 4:14-15; Jn 3:34; Jn 6:63

The content of Jesus Christ’s preaching and teaching
The kingdom of God

  •  Lk 9:11 See also Mt 4:17,23; Mt 6:33; Mt 13:24; Mk 1:15; Jn 3:3
God as Father
  • Jn 14:8-14 See also Mt 6:31-32  Lk 12:30-31; Mt 10:32-33; Mt 18:10; Mk 11:25; Jn 5:17-23; Jn 8:18-19
 
Jesus Christ’s own identity
  • Jn 4:25-26 See also Mt 16:13-17 pp Mk 8:27-30 pp Lk 9:18-21; Lk 4:20-21; Lk 24:44; Jn 10:11; Jn 14:6-7

Jesus Christ’s mission

  •  Mk 9:31 pp Mt 17:22-23  Lk 9:44 See also Mt 20:17-19 pp Mk 10:32-34 Lk 18:31-34; Lk 19:9-10; Lk 24:46; Jn 6:51; Jn 10:14-15

EXPOSITION:


Luke 4:15  And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified of all.

And he taught in their synagogues, being glorified of all. His miracles, his words touching and eloquent, perhaps too a dim memory of marvels which had happened years before at his birth, shed round the new Teacher a halo of glory. It was only when, instead of the Messianic hopes of conquest and power which they cherished, a life of brave self-denial and quiet generosity was preached, that the reaction against him set in. The men of Nazareth, with their violent antagonism, which we are about to consider, were only, after all, a few months in advance of the rest of the nation in their rejection of the Messiah.

Verse 16
Where he had been brought up (ου ην τετραμμενος — hou ēn tethrammenos). Past perfect passive periphrastic indicative, a state of completion in past time, from τρεπω — trephō a common Greek verb. This visit is before that recorded in Mark 6:1-6; Matthew 13:54-58 which was just before the third tour of Galilee. Here Jesus comes back after a year of public ministry elsewhere and with a wide reputation (Luke 4:15). Luke may have in mind Luke 2:51, but for some time now Nazareth had not been his home and that fact may be implied by the past perfect tense.

 
As his custom was (κατα το ειωτος αυτωι — kata to eiōthos autōi). Second perfect active neuter singular participle of an old ετω — ethō (Homer), to be accustomed. Literally according to what was customary to him (αυτωι — autōi dative case). This is one of the flashlights on the early life of Jesus. He had the habit of going to public worship in the synagogue as a boy, a habit that he kept up when a grown man. If the child does not form the habit of going to church, the man is almost certain not to have it. We have already had in Matthew and Mark frequent instances of the word synagogue which played such a large part in Jewish life after the restoration from Babylon.
 
Jesus grew up going to the synagogue every Sabbath. Now He is back in his hometown of Nazareth, and true to form we read in verse 16 that “on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom….” Let me make the obvious point that going to synagogue was part of His regular weekly schedule. Because this was His habit, He didn’t get up in the morning and wonder if He should go, or allow anything else to get in the way of going, or not go if He was tired, or stay home because He didn’t like something in the service. It was His custom to go, no matter what. I love seeing how so many of you have made a commitment to attend services each week. May your tribe increase!
 
Jesus grew up going to the synagogue every Sabbath. Now He is back in his hometown of Nazareth, and true to form we read in verse 16 that “on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom….” Let me make the obvious point that going to synagogue was part of His regular weekly schedule. Because this was His habit, He didn’t get up in the morning and wonder if He should go, or allow anything else to get in the way of going, or not go if He was tired, or stay home because He didn’t like something in the service. It was His custom to go, no matter what. I love seeing how so many of you have made a commitment to attend services each week. May your tribe increase!

Stood up (ανεστη — anestē). Second aorist active indicative and intransitive. Very common verb. It was the custom for the reader to stand except when the Book of Esther was read at the feast of Purim when he might sit. It is not here stated that Jesus had been in the habit of standing up to read here or elsewhere. It was his habit to go to the synagogue for worship. Since he entered upon his Messianic work his habit was to teach in the synagogues (Luke 4:15). This was apparently the first time that he had done so in Nazareth. He may have been asked to read as Paul was in Antioch in Pisidia (Acts 13:15). The ruler of the synagogue for that day may have invited Jesus to read and speak because of his now great reputation as a teacher. Jesus could have stood up voluntarily and appropriately because of his interest in his home town.
 
To read (αναγνωναι — anagnōnai). Second aorist active infinitive of αναγινωσκω — anaginōskō to recognize again the written characters and so to read and then to read aloud. It appears first in Pindar in the sense of read and always so in the N.T. This public reading aloud with occasional comments may explain the parenthesis in Matthew 24:15 (Let him that readeth understand).
 
And, as his custom was, he went … - From this it appears that the Saviour regularly attended the service of the synagogue. In that service the Scriptures of the Old Testament were read, prayers were offered, and the Word of God was explained. See the notes at Matthew 4:23. There was great corruption in doctrine and practice at that time, but Christ did not on that account keep away from the place of public worship.
 
From this we may learn:
1.That it is our duty “regularly” to attend public worship.
2.That it is better to attend a place of worship which is not entirely pure, or where just such doctrines are not delivered as we would wish, than not attend at all.


It is of vast importance that the public worship of God should be maintained; and it is “our” duty to assist in maintaining it, to show by our example that we love it, and to win others also to love it. See Hebrews 10:25. At the same time, this remark should not be construed as enjoining it as our duty to attend where the “true” God is not worshipped, or where he is worshipped by pagan rites and pagan prayers. If, therefore, the Unitarian does not worship the true God, and if the Roman Catholic worships God in a manner forbidden and offers homage to the creatures of God, thus being guilty of idolatry, it cannot be a duty to attend on such a place of worship.


The synagogue - Matthew 4:23.

 
Stood up for to read - The books of Moses were so divided that they could be read through in the synagogues once in a year. To these were added portions out of the prophets, so that no small part of them was read also once a year. It is not known whether our Saviour read the lesson which was the regular one for that day, though it might seem “probable” that he would not depart from the usual custom. Yet, as the eyes of all were fixed on him; as he deliberately looked out a place; and as the people were evidently surprised at what he did, it seems to be intimated that he selected a lesson which was “not” the regular one for that day. The same ceremonies in regard to conducting public worship which are here described are observed at Jerusalem by the Jews at the present time. Professor Hackett (“Illustrations of Scripture,” p. 232) says: “I attended the Jewish worship at Jerusalem, and was struck with the accordance of the ceremonies with those mentioned in the New Testament. The sacred roll was brought from the chest or closet where it was kept; it was handed by an attendant to the reader; a portion of it was rehearsed; the congregation rose and stood while it was read, whereas the speaker, as well as the others present, sat during the delivery of the address which formed a part of the service.”
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Verse 17   And there was delivered unto him the book of the prophet Esaias. And when he had opened the book, he found the place where it was written,

 
And there was delivered unto him the Book of the Prophet Esaias. In the sabbath service there were two lessons read. The first was always taken from the Pentateuch (the Law). The five books of Moses were written on parchment, (usually) between two rollers, and the day's lesson was left unrolled for the reader's convenience. The Prophets were on single rollers, no special portion being left open. It has been suggested that the great and famous Messianic passage read by our Lord was the lesson for the day. This is quite uncertain; indeed, it is more probable that Jesus, when the roll of Isaiah was handed to him by the ruler of the synagogue, specially selected the section containing this passage.
 
Verse 17
as delivered (επεδοτη — epedothē). First aorist passive indicative of επιδιδωμι — epididōmi to give over to, a common verb. At the proper stage of the service “the attendant” or “minister” (υπηρετης — hupēretēs under rower) or “beadle” took out a roll of the law from the ark, unwrapped it, and gave it to some one to read. On sabbath days some seven persons were asked to read small portions of the law. This was the first lesson or Parashah. This was followed by a reading from the prophets and a discourse, the second lesson or Haphtarah. This last is what Jesus did.


The book of the prophet Isaiah (βιβλιον του προπητου Εσαιου — biblion tou prophētou Esaiou). Literally, “a roll of the prophet Isaiah.” Apparently Isaiah was handed to Jesus without his asking for it. But certainly Jesus cared more for the prophets than for the ceremonial law. It was a congenial service that he was asked to perform. Jesus used Deuteronomy in his temptations and now Isaiah for this sermon. The Syriac Sinaitic manuscript has it that Jesus stood up after the attendant handed him the roll.

 
Opened (ανοιχας — anoixas). Really it was unrolled (αναπτυχας — anaptuxas) as Aleph D have it. But the more general term ανοιχας — anoixas (from ανοιγω — anoigō common verb) is probably genuine. Αναπτυσσω — Anaptussō does not occur in the N.T. outside of this passage if genuine.

Found the place (ευρεν τον τοπον — heuren ton topon). Second aorist active indicative. He continued to unroll (rolling up the other side) till he found the passage desired. It may have been a fixed lesson for the day or it may have been his own choosing. At any rate it was a marvellously appropriate passage (Isaiah 61:1, Isaiah 61:2 with one clause omitted and some words from Isaiah 58:6). It is a free quotation from the Septuagint.

 
Where it was written (ου ην γεγραμμενον — hou ēn gegrammenon). Periphrastic pluperfect passive again as in Luke 4:16.


Verse 17
There was delivered unto him - By the minister of the synagogue, or the keeper of the sacred books. They were kept in an “ark” or chest, not far from the pulpit, and the minister gave them to whomsoever he chose, to read them publicly.

The book - The volume contained the prophecy of Isaiah. It would seem, from this, that the books were kept separate, and not united into one as with us.

When he had opened the book - Literally, when he had “unrolled” the book. Books, among the ancients, were written on parchments or vellum that is, skins of beasts, and were “rolled” together on two rollers, beginning at each end, so that while reading they rolled off from one to the other. Different forms of books were indeed used, but this was the most common. When used the reader unrolled the manuscript as far as the place which he wished to find, and kept before him just so much as he would read. When the roller was done with, it was carefully deposited in a case.


The place where it was written - Isaiah 61:1-2.
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